Enter your data for 1-Sample Equivalence Test

Stat > Equivalence Tests > 1-Sample

Enter your data

Select the option that best describes your data.

Sample in a column

If your data are in a column of the worksheet, complete the following steps.

  1. From the drop-down list, select Sample in a column.
  2. In Sample, enter the column of numeric data that you want to analyze.
    Tip

    Click in Sample to see the columns that are available for your analysis.

  3. In Target, enter a target or a reference value. For example, the target amount of active ingredient for a new generic drug is 250 mg/ml.
In this worksheet, Strength contains the amount of active ingredient in a random sample of drug tablets.
C1
Strength
250.1
253.0
247.8
248.2

Summarized data

If you have summary statistics for the sample, rather than sample data in the worksheet, complete the following steps.

  1. From the drop-down list, select Summarized data.
  2. Enter the summary statistics in Sample size, Mean, and Standard deviation.
  3. In Target, enter a target or a reference value. For example, the target of active ingredient for a new generic drug is 250 mg/ml.

Alternative hypothesis

From the drop-down list, select the hypothesis that you want to prove or demonstrate.
Lower limit < test mean - target < upper limit

Test whether the difference between the mean of the test population and the target is within the limits that you specify.

For example, an analyst wants to determine whether the mean strength of a generic drug is within ± 10 mg/ml of the target strength.

Test mean > target

Test whether the mean of the test population is greater than the target.

For example, a food analyst wants to determine whether a less expensive formulation of a dry dog food has a mean amount of protein that is greater than 20g (per 100g of food).

Test mean < target

Test whether the mean of the test population is less than the target.

For example, an analyst wants to determine whether the mean time for a new medication to take effect is less than 5 minutes.

Test mean - target > lower limit

Test whether the difference between the mean of the test population and the target is greater than a lower limit.

For example, a researcher wants to determine whether an experimental drug induces a mean reduction in diastolic blood pressure that is greater than the expected reduction (target) by 3 mm Hg or more.

Test mean - target < upper limit

Test whether the difference between the mean of the test population and the target is less than an upper limit.

For example, an analyst wants to determine whether the mean waiting time in an emergency department is less than 10% over target.

Equivalence limits

Enter a value for each equivalence limit that is included in the alternative hypothesis.

Lower limit

Enter the lowest acceptable value for the difference. You want to demonstrate that the difference between the mean of the test population and the target is not lower than this value.

Upper limit

Enter the highest acceptable value for the difference. You want to demonstrate that the difference between the mean of the test population and the target does not exceed this value.

Multiply by target

Select to specify that the limit represents a proportion of the target. Use to test whether the mean of the test population is within a certain percentage of a target. For example, select this option to change the limit from a fixed value of 0.1 to a value that equals 10% of the target.

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